Telecom & Infrastructure

THE NETWORK EFFECT ACROSS BANDWIDTH AND INFRASTRUCTURE

TOWARD INTERNET OF (ALMOST) EVERYTHING - Historically, telecom have always experienced multiple revolutions as new mean of communications were developed. However, in the past 20 years, this trend has further accelerated with the development of internet and wireless systems, further putting pressure on telecom networks. From voice and text data, telecom infrastructures have now switched to IP data which traffic is exploding with the increased number of connected systems (smartphones, tablets, wearables, etc) and the trend of Internet of Objects (IoT). In the future, development of 5G as well as cloud-based applications will require telecom infrastructure to continue innovate, without speaking of 6G development. And semiconductors continue playing a huge part in telecoms technologies, weaving together the global telecom network that keeps people connected.

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5G: THE NEXT BIG OPPORTUNITY FOR SEMICONDUCTORS

Wide adoption of semiconductor devices in telecom since the 1950s has enabled significant advances in technology and led to the democratization of telecom services. Consequently, there have been an enormous increase in network traffic growth, across all network architectures – from long haul mobile access to inter and intra-datacenter networks. Mobile bandwidth requirements have moved from voice calls and texting to ultra-high-definition videos and a variety of new applications (cloud gaming, virtual and augmented reality, machine-to-machine communication, etc). In this field, the coming 5G revolution is necessary to provide higher bandwidth, broadband access, etc.

Overall, from fiber-optic communication to servers, storage and site/antenna, telecom systems have to integrate new semiconductor technologies to keep up with new types of bandwidth demand. Those development is mostly oriented toward power electronics, photonics, RF, memory and computing devices, with deployment of 5G technology.

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A MATTER OF OPTICS, PHOTONICS, RADIOFREQUENCY AND COMPUTING

The telecom sectors must adapt to meet global trends related to the exponential growth in data consumption. At the same time, they must keep an eye on expanding machine-to-machine applications, high bandwidth, speed and low latency requirements, energy efficiency, cost savings (through deep optics) and electronics integration, combined with ASIC and Digital Signal Processing (DSP).

The disaggregation of datacenters can also be key to increased flexibility and lower maintenance. Pooling computing, memory and storage elements into specific locations allows for changes to be implemented easily without impacting other parts of the datacenters.

All those trends make that telecom sector will have to leverage on emerging semiconductor technologies. These technologies have the potential to revolutionize customer experience, network expansion and infrastructure management.

An example here about future innovations can be the integration of photonic integrated circuits (PICs), also known as silicon photonics technology. Integrating complex electro-optical circuits onto a single silicon chip enables the creation of new form factors while increasing the bandwidth and distance. This significantly improves power efficiency and density in ways that simply could never be addressed with discrete devices.

Our Vision

WITH EVERY FIBER OF OUR BROADBAND BEING

The telecom industry and its semiconductor technologies may primarily be divided into data communications and telecommunications (communication over a distance).

At Yole Group, we consider two main market segments: data communications and telecommunications (communication over a distance).

The definition of telecommunications is growing to encompass long distance communication by different means – optical, wire or radio. “Data communications” specifically refers to digital interconnection within a data center using mostly fiber optics as a communication channel.

This segmentation forms the basis for the industrial infrastructure value chain and technology classification. The value chain of both sectors consists of datacom and telecom (cloud and voice) service operators, equipment suppliers, module suppliers and component/material system designers and manufacturers.

Analysts at Yole Group follow optical, photonics, RF and computing technologies from wafer level all the way to the packaged modules and sub-systems used in both datacom and telecom end-systems. From long-haul networks to the “last mile”, we monitor impact of global network IP traffic growth on fiber-optic communication systems, servers and storage systems, as well as RF ones.

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HELPING YOU FIND THE SWEET SPOT IN YOUR NETWORK

At Yole Group we identify, analyze and understand where radiofrequency communication technologies are headed, in parallel with their optical and photonics counterparts. We monitor related end-systems, devices and materials with a strong focus on: antenna systems and radio heads, RF chain, servers (CPU, GPU, ASIC), storage (NAND, DRAM memory), optical transceivers (VCSEL and EEL-based), silicon photonics platforms and InP/GaAs wafers.
We can also inform you of the implications of storage and processing for the telecom and infrastructure industry.
In parallel, Yole Group develops a significant expertise focused on RF technologies for smartphones applications. We deep dive in the smartphone to identify the technical choices made by the leading Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) and evaluate the related costs and market shares. For each smartphone, we deliver valuable production forecasts per segment including Wi-Fi air standard, MIMO order, band support. We point out overall market at RF board level for the several parts: Wi-Fi connectivity, cellular RF front end, 5G mmWave, geolocation, cellular SoC and RF transceiver.